Choosing an LPN Program or Medical Assistant Program

When exploring the healthcare field, it can be difficult to know which program is best for you. LPN Programs (Licensed Practical Nurse) and Medical Assistant can have similarities and differences.

Ross has Medical Assistant Training Programs in Alabama, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, Ohio, Tennessee, and West Virginia.

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What is the difference between an LPN and a Medical Assistant?

LPN Program with skeleton

Many people are unsure on the specific differences between an LPN and a Medical Assistant. An LPN is a Licensed Practical Nurse. To become an LPN, you must attend a training program and become licensed. Usually the training programs are at least a year in length. LPNs are trained clinically and mostly work in long-term care facilities, hospitals, and nursing homes.

The hours LPNs work can vary significantly, but because they are in hospitals and nursing homes, they often work days, nights, weekends, and holidays. Day shifts can be harder to come by as an LPN than as a Medical Assistant. Many LPN programs are designed with a strong clinical focus with little emphasis on administration. This is why LPNs often work in hospitals and long-term care facilities while Medical Assistants can also be found in doctors’ offices and clinics.

What is a Medical Assistant?

Although Medical Assistants are able to perform many of the same tasks and in some cases are even taking over positions previously held by LPNs, they also can work in a wide variety of locations and are able to do more administrative tasks in addition to the clinical tasks. They are more likely to work in doctor’s offices and clinics in addition to hospitals and other facilities.

Because they are trained for both administrative and clinical tasks, Medical Assistants can be extremely marketable. Some of their tasks include explaining procedures to patients, taking vitals, performing basic tests, assisting during examinations, performing injections, and recording patient information. However, they are also able to do such things as answering phones, setting appointments, insurance billing, and various other office tasks.

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What is the difference between an LPN and RN?

An LPN is a Licensed Practical Nurse while an RN is a Registered Nurse. Many people get the two confused because they both are nurses. However, an LPN and an RN are very different. Many times, both RNs and LPNs work in hospitals and long-term care facilities, but usually the RN acts as a manager to the LPN. RNs have a professional degree that usually takes either two years or four years to earn while LPNs can get licensed in as little as a year. Due to this, LPNs may be restricted from doing some of the tasks that an RN will perform.

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Find out more about the Medical Assistant Program

Now that you’ve learned some of the differences between LPN and MA training and careers, visit our Medical Assistant page to find out more about what we have to offer. You will find information about the the program and your potential future as a Medical Assistant. You can also read about the program length, the campuses that offer it, the hands-on externship opportunities available, and an overview of the topics covered during the course. Additionally, there is information regarding career opportunities and answers to some Frequently Asked Questions about our program. Click the button below to learn more!



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By clicking Submit, I give Ross Medical Education Center my consent to receive email and calls or texts to the phone number(s) provided, including a wireless number, if applicable. I understand that my consent is not required to submit my application or attend Ross, but simply allows Ross to contact me more efficiently.